Bourne Images: Blog https://www.bourneimages.com/blog en-us All Images (C) Bourne Images bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) Sun, 19 Dec 2021 17:23:00 GMT Sun, 19 Dec 2021 17:23:00 GMT https://www.bourneimages.com/img/s/v-12/u990693430-o230118425-50.jpg Bourne Images: Blog https://www.bourneimages.com/blog 120 24 Warcat Tactical IWB MRDS and OWB MRDS Holsters. https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/warcat-tactical-iwb-mrds-and-owb-mrds-holsters Over the last few years, we have seen a significant increase, year on year, of firearms sales. People are concerned about the state of the world we live in. The biggest growth in gun sales is in the personal self defense category where men and an increasing amount of women are obtaining their LTC (License To Carry) / CCL (Concealed Carry License), whatever your state chooses to call it. The decision to carry a firearm to protect yourself and your family is something that should not be taken lightly, so choosing the right firearm that will work for your situation, be comfortable to shoot and comfortable to carry is no easy thing and only one part of a big package. Let me explain.

You've made the decision to purchase your first firearm and passed your carry certification course. Time to get yourself a holster and then you're set, right ? Not exactly. It's all too easy to make a snap decision to buy that all singing, all dancing, super-duper flash looking holster you saw at the gun show, or at the local gun store or even in one of the gun magazines at the store. Do that and odds are that you'll find yourself not carrying at all. It's too bulky to wear, too difficult to conceal, it's painful to wear, it's too powerful to handle when you shoot it, or you can't hit the target. All these are classic signs that you didn't think everything through beforehand. For the many of us who have found ourselves in that exact situation, it is somewhat comforting to know that most gun owners who decide to make the commitment to concealed carry go through a lot of these issues until they find the right gear; and then train, practice and adapt.

Warcat Tactical Inside Waistband (IWB) MRDS Holster for the Glock 45 MOS

 

For now, we're going to jump ahead, just a little. You've done your due diligence, decided on the correct pistol and caliber that is right for you - one that you can handle and be on target with and one that you can commit to carrying...all the time. Now it's time to choose a carry method for your firearm. This, again, is no easy, quick choice.

Are you wanting to carrying on or off body? There are pros and cons for both methods, but it really is dependent on your personal situation. Body size, clothing choice/circumstances, and can you legally carry in the places you will be going to?  For today, we're gong to look at the "on body" carry option.

Many holsters out there in the market today are made of Kydex, the thin(ish) mold-able material chosen by so many of the smaller and a few of the larger holster manufacturers. These holsters can be easily customized with different colors, finishes, fancy and elaborate designs with attached magazine holders and other options. Obviously, the more fancy you make it, the more options you add on, the pricier it gets. Also, there is still the possibility it will be uncomfortable to wear (sharp pointed edges). Add more options (spare magazine holder) and you increase the odds it'll print (be seen through your clothing) and be obvious to everyone you're carrying a firearm. Not exactly concealed carry now is it?

Warcat Tactical Inside Waistband (IWB) MRDS Holster for the Glock 45 MOS.

 

In today's blog, we take a look at a couple of new to the market holsters that are predominantly designed for on body carry. Unusually for the concealed carry market, these are not made of Kydex, and the company making these holsters is actually situated right here in the U.S. of A...to be precise, Post Falls, ID. Welcome to the review of a series of IWB and OWB holsters from new manufacturer...Warcat Tactical.

Warcat Tactical is a new entrant into the already packed arena of pistol holster manufacturers. They are retired military, retired & part-time law enforcement, competitive shooters and hunters, so they know a thing or two about what it takes to make you feel comfortable enough to WANT to carry your firearm with you.

The products offered by Warcat are different to so many of today's holsters as they are made from polymer that is injection molded to fit each specific pistol. Their holsters are said to be 20% lighter, 40% tougher and 80% more heat resistant than other molded holsters available in the industry. That is a claim I can vouch for after opening the packaging. The thickness or should I say the lack of thickness for an injection molded holster is very pleasing. Other injection molded holsters tend to be noticeably thicker than the kydex type. The two offerings (IWB & OWB styles) released so far by Warcat are no thicker than the popular Kydex material used, so bulk and the possibility of printing will be reduced. The inside and exterior finish of their holsters is equally impressive. Smooth pistol form/shape transitions, no sharp edges. Nice job Warcat Tactical!

(Image courtesy of Warcat Tactical)

 

Warcat Tactical include a wedge and claw with every IWB holster. The belt clip can be adjusted to one of three different "ride" heights by simply undoing the mounting screws on the clip and switching the height position. The wedge can be stuck onto the inside of the holster to assist with printing reduction. It also adds a comfort factor with the holster pressed against the body. The "claw" can be attached to the belt clip side of the holster (see image above) when the IWB holster is worn at the appendix position. When wearing a belt and putting the IWB holster with the claw at the appendix position, the pressure of the belt across the claw pulls the lower part of the pistol grip in toward your body, which in turn, reduces the possibility of your pistol printing. The claw is most commonly used when wearing a firearm at the appendix position.

However, there are many that feel when using the claw on an OWB holster, it is still comfortable and effective in reducing printing when wearing at the 3 to 5 or 7 to 9 o’clock positions.

Pistol retention (the amount of grip or hold the holster puts on the pistol) on both the IWB and OWB can be adjusted to suit your draw tension preference. The adjustment Allen screw is just in front of the trigger guard (see image below). The fine people at Warcat include an Allen key with your holster.

Warcat Tactical Outside The Waistband (OWB) MRDS Holster for the Glock 45 MOS.

 

The Outside The Waistband (OWB) example from Warcat is no less impressive. It has the same excellent finish and It is really nice to see that the quality control across the two different styles of holsters has been maintained. So often, manufacturers will put all their eggs into one basket and tend to have a bias toward their IWB holsters, only for their other products to appear to fall short of the same standard. Each Warcat IWB and OWB holster has the particular pistol fitment option for that holster embossed into the sweat guard which can be seen clearly in the image above.

The OWB comes set with a neutral cant position. It be adjusted by removing the screws from the paddle fitment and selecting either a positive or negative cant and then refitting the screw. I always suggest using a little drop of Blue Loctite when removing and replacing any screws on holsters and the like.

Warcat's manufacturing process has allowed them to make and offer their IWB and OWB holsters with an integral pistol mounted MRDS (modular red dot system) hood option for no extra cost! The MRDS hood protects your pistol red dot from any impact and debris plus it also stops the red dot from digging into your body. So many holsters out there only offer a standard red dot cut out. Another thumbs up for Warcat.

The impressive in-house designed and Warcat branded 1.5" belt clips for the IWB and a branded, sturdy but still flexible enough, dual purpose paddle mount / 1.5" belt clip is mounted on the OWB. Yet further proof that the people at Warcat have done their homework and taken notice of all the complaints from other holster brand owners over the years. I have to say that this is quality not normally seen unless you're unloading lots of cash on a Safariland holster. I should know, I own four Safariland holsters and I rate them. Since receiving the Warcat products, I have to say I like them a lot. They say there are more products in the pipeline. Would it be too presumptuous to expect magazine holders will be released soon? It'll be interesting to see if they delve into the law enforcement and military level 2 and 3 retention holster market, I hope they do. I'm genuinely excited to see what they come out with next.

What is also impressive is that all Warcat Tactical holsters come with a 30-Day Return Policy and their 9-Lives Warranty. If anything on your Warcat Tactical Holster ever breaks for any reason, they’ll repair or replace it for free ... you can't ask anymore than that, can you?

At the time of writing this blog, Warcat have IWB and OWB holster fitments for Glock, S&W Shield's, Sig P365's and Springfield Hellcat's.

You can find the available fitment options for those brands HERE  at our Amazon affiliate link. Their prices are amazing. Go check them out and let me know what you think. I believe Warcat Tactical are going places.

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) adjustable cant affordable american b&w belt belt clip black black and white photography blog blog of the day blogger bullets cant comfort comfortable compact competition concealed carry concealment draw dslr editing excellent firearm fit fullsize glock gun holster impressive IWB kydex leather level 2 retention made" magazine magnet mrds nikkor nikon OWB p365 paddle peace photography pistol pistol mounted red dot polymer product product review protection rds red dot red dot optic retention review s&w security self defense shield sig sig sauer springfield springfield hellcat studio photography sweatguard trigger trigger guard warcat warcat tactical weapon weapon light weapon mounted light https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/warcat-tactical-iwb-mrds-and-owb-mrds-holsters Sun, 19 Dec 2021 05:10:25 GMT
What's coming in 2022 ! https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/whats-coming-in-2022 Hi, I just wanted to post a little update on the end of 2021 what's coming to the blog in 2022.

As 2021 comes to a close, we have recently added links to the products we have reviewed. These links are accessible by clicking the word HERE in the specific section of each review. Clicking on HERE will take you to an Amazon Affiliate link where you will find the item. Affiliate links allow us as content creators and bloggers to direct you (our audience) to the reviewed item's Amazon product page (or any associated item recommendation). In turn, any small amount of monetary help some of the links may bring, will help us to continue to access more items to review in the blog. So, if you'd like us to review more products and you'd like to get yourself or a loved one an item being reviewed, using the affiliate links to do so would be greatly appreciated. We are also trying to get coupon codes for you to get some discount off the price of the products we review. If we get a coupon code, we'll be sure to add it in the review.

For 2022, we'll be adding more topics and subject matter to the blog content. We have upcoming items I'm sure you'll find exciting and entertaining along with more products from brands we've reviewed already.

One of the new additions for 2022 will be a new blog series. "A beginner learns to play the guitar," which will feature my struggle (lol) as I learn to play the guitar after decades of procrastination and self doubt. We will be complementing the guitar blog series with what will be a new venture, and I'm sure it will be a real adventure for us...a YouTube channel!  "The Bourne Review" will air on YouTube sometime in January 2020 with the guitar series along with video featuring new topics and exciting products...plus video reviews of the products already featured in the blog. So, stay tuned for an exciting and busy 2022.

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 2022 2201 activated adventure affiliate amazon american americas amp and apocalypse art arts assignment audience automotive beginner blog blog of the day blogger blogs boss bourne business channel communication content content creators coupon coupon code coupon codes creator creators daily decades discussed doubt doubt" earth easy edition elements EM-5 England eos equipment essential exciting fender guitar icon influencer influencers journal joy learn learns lesson lessons music music & arts music and arts new note notebook novice on air play procrastination products review rookie squier stratocaster the bourne review theology topic topics upcoming upcoming items video vlog YouTube https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/whats-coming-in-2022 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:43:04 GMT
The TEGE Universal Double Magazine Holder https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/tege-universal-mag-holder In today's blog, we'll take a look at another offering from the TEGE Holster company. This time it's an outside the waistband (OWB) universal fitment magazine holder.

There are two versions available from TEGE, the single magazine version and this one, the Universal Double Magazine Holder. Made from the same injected polymer as the other holster offerings we've reviewed from TEGE. The fit, form, and function are up to the same impressive standard that we've seen from them before. The double mag version is available with either a paddle mount or belt clip mount option. For now, the mag holders are only available in black.

Both the single and double mag holders will accommodate both 9mm and .40 calibers double stack magazines from all the major manufacturers. The magazine retention on both versions is adjustable. Each holder has an inbuilt spring tension piece to aid with the difference in magazine widths (see the side of the mag holder on the above image).

On the double mag holder we received from TEGE, a centrally positioned Allen screw between the two mag holders allows fine tuning of retention by simply tightening or loosening the Allen screw. The holster cant or "tilt" angle can also be adjusted with the provided Allen key from 0 to 60 degrees allowing you to achieve the most comfortable and effective position (see image below). On our universal dual magazine holder, an adjustable belt clip was the mounting option supplied. It can work with belts from 1.5” to 2” and attaches to your belt in an almost identical way to the Blade-Tech Tek-Lok system. It doesn’t have that very firm “click” lock like the Tek-Loks I’ve experienced, but it is very secure when locked.

As with the other TEGE Holster products we’ve reviewed, the finish and fitment is very good. Both the inside and exterior of the holder have smooth contoured shapes, there are no sharp or rough edges or molding spurs and getting the magazine holder into a comfortable place on your belt is achieved thanks to the easily adjusted belt clip attachment.

This is the third polymer holder we’ve reviewed from TEGE and, with each one, I think it’s amazing how they are able to make these holsters so inexpensive. Admittedly, the products made by TEGE are thicker than Kydex-made products and are fractionally thicker than other polymer injected holsters I’ve seen, but not by much.

What about robustness and longevity? Well, I’ve not been able to put the magazine holder through any kind of heavy abuse yet, but nothing has broken or failed. What I can say is that this mag holder feels robust enough for range use, for those times when you want more than just one magazine at hand or when it’s time for mag change practice drills. Take a shot (pardon the pun) and add this one to your range gear, it won’t disappoint.

 

You can find this universal double magazine holder HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

Here is a recommended fitment list from TEGE. If your particular model isn't listed below, there's no guarantee your magazine will fit correctly. I can confirm that the Magpul 15 GL-9 and Magpul 17 GL-9 magazines do fit perfectly along with any aftermarket Glock 9mm or .40 caliber magazine.


 

Glock: Glock 17/19/19X/22/23/25/26/27/31/32/33/34/35/37/38/39/45 (Gen1-Gen5)

Sig Sauer: Sig Sauer P250 FS/Sig Sauer P226 P229 P320/SIG PRO 9 mm/Sig Sauer MK25/Sig Sauer P250 Compact 9mm/.40

S&W: S&W Sigma/S&W SERIES 40, 59, 69/S&W SW99 9mm .40/S&W M&P 9mm .40 .357

Beretta: Beretta 92 96/Beretta PX4 Storm PX4 F/Beretta M9A3/Beretta PX4 9mm/.40

Taurus: Taurus 24/7/Taurus 92/Taurus 100/Taurus PT909 9mm/Taurus PT800 Series 9mm .40

Walther: Walther PPX/Walther P88/Walther P99/Walther PPQ M1 (Classic), M2

Springfield: Springfield XD/XDM 9mm/.40/XDM-9 4.5/XD-9 Mod 2 Tactical

Browning: Browning BDM 9mm/Browning HI-Power 9mm/.40

H&K: H&K P30/ VP9/P30 V3 P30SK-V3/H&K SFP9-SF/SFP9-SF PB/SFP9-SF OR/SFP9-SF SD/SFP9/H&K USP FS/Compact 9mm/.40

Ruger: Ruger SR9/Ruger P89-P95 Series 9mm/.40 

Steyr: Steyr M Series 

Colt: Colt 2000 9mm

CZ: CZ P07/CZ P-09/CZ 75 Tactical Sports/CZ SP-01 Shadow/CZ Shadow 2/CZ P-10C

EAA: EAA Witness 9mm/.40 

Kel-Tec: Kel-Tec P11, P40

Magnum: Magnum Baby Eagle 9mm/.40

 


 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) adjustable cant affordable b&w belt belt clip beretta black black and white photography blog blog of the day blogger bullets cant color color photography colour colour photography comfort comfortable compact competition concealment digital digital photography draw dslr editing excellent firearm fit flash flash photography FN fullsize glock gun holster IWB kydex leather level 2 retention lexar lightroom magazine magnet nikkor nikon OWB paddle peace pistol pistol mounted red dot polymer product product photographer product photogrphy product review protection rds red dot red dot optic reload retention review rounds S&W security self defense studio studio lights studio photography sweatguard tege tege holsters thumb retention trigger trigger guard walther weapon weapon light weapon mounted light https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/tege-universal-mag-holder Sun, 12 Dec 2021 22:03:36 GMT
TEGE Holsters (IWB) Inside Waistband Concealed Carry Holster https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/tege-holsters-iwb-inside-waistband-concealed-carry-holster In my last post, I reviewed the Tege Holsters Tactical OWB Paddle Holster (Glock 19, 19X, 23, 32, 44, 45 (Gen 1-5). From the moment I unboxed it, it impressed. Yes, there was one potential con I noted but until the holster can be put under a tough barrage of tactical scenerios, it scores high in the design and functionality of a tactical holster. In this blog, we have another of the impressive TEGE Holster products to review.

TEGE Holsters IWB Concealed Carry Holster (this version was a Glock 19, 19X, 23, 32, 44, 45 (Gen 1-5) fitment which is currently unavailable. The link to the Gloch 43 and 43X is at the bottom of the review).

As with the Tactical OWB, the IWB concealed carry holsters are made of injection polymer. The lines are clean and smooth, both on the inside and outside with no sharp edges so commonly found on many Kydex made holsters. The injected polymer holsters are by design, marginally thicker than kydex but are much more rigid and consistent in their retention over time. Retention (the grip on the pistol made by the holster) is solid and rattle free. Adjustments can be made to the retention via the hex screw just in front of the trigger guard. There is a generous sight channel that should accommodate most height sights but I believe some of the suppressor height sights available will be too tall for this holster. The holster runs 3/4 of the length of the slide. If you have a red dot mounted to your pistol, you'll need to look to a different holster as it covers a section of the red dot plate area. There is a generous, full slide length sweat guard on the inside of the holster where the holster would be against your body or clothing. The sweat guard also acts as an abrasion buffer. The lack of a full sweat guard not only protects your firearm against the salty corrosive body sweat but also protects the side of your torso from "mid-drift slide serration rub". I have seen many images and scars to prove the point.

This holster is a level 1 retention holster. It's specification provides the minimal retention level of the three types. For those not familiar with the levels of retention for holsters, here's a basic guide to the three levels of retention:

  1. Level 1 holsters will have a single retention method, and is most common for concealed-carry, and the holster holds the pistol only via friction, so you must pull firmly to overcome the friction and remove the pistol. 
  2. Level 2 holsters are primarily used by Law Enforcement (LE), who require extra safeguards to prevent their pistols from being removed by somebody else.  They feature a combination of two retention methods, such as friction plus button release, or a thumb strap over the back of the slide plus a button release. Some may use a rotating hood across the back of the slide and friction tension.
  3. Level 3 holsters are again primarily for LE and military and will have three separate mechanical features used to contain the weapon in the holster. The user will have to disengage these 3 stages in order to draw the weapon. The process is actually very quick and can even be disengaged in stages of readiness.

The belt clip or hook is attached by two hex screws and is made of the same polymer material as the holster. It fits over the outside of your pants and your belt sits in the cradle of the hook. When you draw your pistol, the hook on the belt clip is caught by the hook and the holster remains in place where you positioned it. I genuinely like the construction of the holster and the clip...however the is a downside to the belt clip. The cant or tilt of the holster is set in the forward position which is normal when wearing holsters at the 3 or 4 o'clock position, somewhere in the 15 degree area. Unfortunately there is no adjustment at the mounting points of the belt clip, it is fixed in the one position. It is a like it or lump it kind of deal.

You can find the TEGE Holsters IWB Concealed Carry Holster for the Glock 43 and 43X HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

Their product line of injected polymer IWB (Inside Waist Band), OWB (Outside Waist Band), IWB leather holsters and magazine holders cater to a number of different makes and models of pistols. Their pricing is very competitive when compared to so much of the holster market out there.

Overall, the TEGE IWB Concealment holster does exactly what it's supposed to and with positive results. For an inexpensive holster, it clearly performs above it's price bracket. There are a lot of holsters out there that cost a lot more than the TEGE but ultimately disappoint big time, I know...I've bought a few ! If you can accept the lack of cant adjustment, you should give this holster a try, you won't be disappointed.


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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) adjustable cant affordable b&w belt belt clip beretta black black and white photography blog blog of the day blogger bullets cant color color photography colour colour photography comfort comfortable compact competition concealment digital digital photography draw dslr editing excellent firearm fit flash flash photography FN fullsize glock gun holster IWB kydex leather level 2 retention lexar lightroom magazine magnet nikkor nikon OWB paddle peace pistol pistol mounted red dot polymer product product photographer product photogrphy product review protection rds red dot red dot optic reload retention review rounds S&W security self defense studio studio lights studio photography sweatguard tege tege holsters thumb retention trigger trigger guard walther weapon weapon light weapon mounted light https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/12/tege-holsters-iwb-inside-waistband-concealed-carry-holster Sun, 05 Dec 2021 02:38:51 GMT
TEGE Holsters. The Tactical OWB Paddle Holster (Glock 19, 19X, 23, 32, 44, 45 (Gen 1-5) Review https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/11/tege-holsters-review As many firearm owners know, the search for a good fitting, practical and comfortable pistol holster can be a severe headache and will most likely result in the outlay of a large amount of mulah, wonga, dosh, reddies, greenbacks, dollars, whatever term you wish to use for money...and the accumulation of a number of ill-fitting, impractical and uncomfortable holsters stuck in a box somewhere collecting dust. In an attempt to hopefully shorten the process, to avoid an unwanted collection and to save as much money as possible, I reached out to TEGE Holsters to evaluate some of their products.

You can find this Tactical OWB Paddle Holster (Glock 19, 19X, 23, 32, 44, 45 (Gen 1-5)  HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

Their product line of injected polymer IWB (Inside Waist Band), OWB (Outside Waist Band) plus IWB leather holsters cater to a number of different makes and models of pistols. Their pricing is very competitive when compared to so much of the holster market out there.

The particular holster in this review is a level 2 retention holster. It's specification offers more security retention than a regular concealed outside the waist band paddle holster. For those not familiar with the levels of retention for holsters, here's a basic guide to the three levels of retention:

  1. A Level 1 holster will have a single retention method, and is most common for concealed-carry, and the holster holds the pistol only via friction, so you must pull firmly to overcome the friction and remove the pistol. 
  2. Level 2 is primarily used by Law Enforcement (LE), who require extra safeguards to prevent their pistols from being removed by somebody else.  They feature a combination of two retention methods, such as friction plus button release, or a thumb strap over the back of the slide plus a button release. Some may use a rotating hood across the back of the slide and friction tension.
  3. level 3 holsters, again primarily for LE and military, will have three separate mechanical features used to contain the weapon in the pistol. The user will have to disengage these 3 stages in order to draw the weapon. The process is actually very quick and can even be disengaged in stages of readiness.

I have seen a lot of Kydex holsters over the last 10 years. A few of the top, well established brands are really good, but are also VERY expensive and may have a long order/build wait time. If you're not prepared to wait and/or pay high prices for your holster, then the available options may leave a bad taste in your mouth...rough edges, overheated, blemished Kydex, bad fitment to the pistol and an overall ugly looking piece of plastic. Any thoughts I had of yet another useless holster quickly disappeared when I opened the packaging. I was immediately impressed by the construction and finish of the holster and the paddle attachment. This level 2 retention TEGE holster is well made with smooth edges and good molding to grip the pistol where needed. The tactile, easy to actuate release lever was a nice touch. I have another brand of level 2 holster with a thumb release lever. It has a firmer release tension. Neither system is bad in any way. With the sample holster that I received, the lever requires less, almost minimal pressure to release the pistol. Some may feel that the minimal amount of pressure needed to release the pistol may make it too easy for someone else (an assailant) to remove the pistol from your holster during a struggle. I have not yet had the opportunity to test it in that particular situation.

 

For this test/review, my pistol choice was the Glock 45 MOS (Gen5 fitment). Drawing the pistol from the holster is easy. Place your hand on the pistol and grip it as you would normally, your thumb naturally sweeps against the lever in a downward motion as you place your hand around the grip, releasing the retention, and the pistol draws out from the holster smoothly without binding. Re-holstering is just as smooth with an audible but quiet click as the thumb lever retention cam system locks onto the front of the trigger guard. The cam does not come anywhere near the trigger so there are no worries about accidental discharges while reholstering. I have pulled and pulled the pistol against the locking cam trying to release the pistol from the holster without using the retention release lever. I have not yet managed to draw the pistol without using the lever. Good job, TEGE.

The paddle attachment is adjustable for cant (angle of forward or backward lean of the pistol when worn). Simply loosen the two screws on the inside of the paddle with the provided allen wrench, adjust to the forward or reverse angle desired and tighten the screws...simple.

 

My intended use for this holster will be for range days and future firearm courses. I plan to put it through it's paces in all environments and weather conditions. I'm interested to see how it matches up against my Safariland 7TS model level 2 holster. That's a big test in itself. Safariland holsters have a tremendous reliability reputation with law enforcement and military around the world. I don’t think TEGE are aiming this holster as a direct competitor against the Safariland level 2 holsters, it seems aimed more at the civilian shooter as opposed to law enforcement and military 

In the future, I'll do an update blog to report back the findings. What do you think...can the level 2 retention TEGE Holster hold it's own and stand up to the torture of range days and courses? Will the TEGE retention mechanism device hold up to the abuse?...I can't wait to find out!


 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) adjustable cant affordable b&w belt belt clip beretta black black and white photography blog blog of the day blogger bullets cant color color photography colour colour photography comfort comfortable compact competition concealment digital digital photography draw dslr editing excellent firearm fit flash flash photography FN fullsize glock gun holster IWB kydex leather level 2 retention lexar lightroom magazine magnet nikkor nikon OWB paddle peace pistol pistol mounted red dot polymer product product photographer product photogrphy product review protection rds red dot red dot optic reload retention review rounds S&W security self defense studio studio lights studio photography sweatguard tege tege holsters thumb retention trigger trigger guard walther weapon weapon light weapon mounted light https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/11/tege-holsters-review Sun, 07 Nov 2021 01:00:01 GMT
Emergency Preparedness: The Setpower AJ50 Portable Fridge/Freezer (53 Quart) https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/9/setpower-aj50-portable-fridge/freezer In our latest Emergency Preparedness product evaluation series, we look at an option to keep your food & drink fresh and fit to consume away from your regular base or even at home when a disaster strikes.

A little while back we were sent a Setpower Portable 53 quart Fridge/Freezer to evaluate for our Emergency Preparedness series. Like most products you “test and evaluate”, you should try your utmost to create some form of realistic emergency scenarios where you may well find yourself needing said product. In these strange times of lockdowns and social distancing, we initially found ourselves not fully able to evaluate the unit in some form of emergency conditions for the blog review as we'd hoped. However, unfortunately for us but fortunately for the blog, we were presented with those exact disaster conditions in the form of the Texas Winter Freeze/Snow Storm in February 2021.

The unexpected well-below-freezing temperatures that hit many parts of Texas during the storm were having devastating effects as water lines started to freeze and power supplies were affected. In our town, many homes were already seeing water pressure drop to a trickle despite running the faucets in an attempt to avoid the dreaded frozen pipes. Rolling power outages started and power companies advised customers to unplug all major appliances, including refrigerators! Conditions never experienced before by many Texans were getting worse by the hour. In the early hours of February 14th 2021 the freeze had set in hard. Interstate highways and state roads were starting to freeze. Heavy snow started to fall making driving conditions extremely difficult and treacherous.

Overnight, the power company turned off all power to the city, the city turned off the water to repair their own damaged equipment, and all attempts to keep the water pipes warm enough to avoid freezing were lost. By 5am, we were without power and had suffered multiple burst pipes. The temperature inside the house was at 23 deg Fahrenheit and we had no electrical power, no heat. With the inside temperature of the house continuing to drop, we decided it was time to leave the house and stay with friends for 24 hours while the power company worked to restore power.

We returned home the following morning. Power had returned, thankfully but with MANY broken water pipes. We were totally without running water. We turned on the refrigerator/freezer and, after a while, were horrified to see it wouldn't get any colder that 50 degrees! The freezing conditions  had affected the electronics/system of the fridge somehow. A bottle of water in our little upstairs fridge gave us a clue to how cold things had gotten inside the house during our absence... frozen solid INSIDE the fridge with NO power on! We looked at buying a new refrigerator, but couldn't get one delivered for three weeks. The only question on our minds in that moment was "Now what do we do?"

"Hang on," my wife said, "we have the SETPOWER!"  It seemed that I'd finally get to put the Setpower through the paces in a true emergency situation. We quickly powered up the AJ50  plugging it into the house 120v outlet and set it to 25 degrees to use it as a portable and temporary (so we thought) freezer . After a short time, the AJ50 display was showing 25 deg so we transferred all the frozen food we'd rescued the day before into the AJ50. As the day progressed the AJ50 kept and constant 25 deg and our food remained perfectly frozen.

As time progressed and damage was assessed, we began the tiring process of insurance claims, trying to get claims adjusters to inspect damage etc. Our insurance company worked with us as best they could, after all, we weren't the only ones affected by this disaster. It took us around 3 weeks until we could get the fridge delivered due to supply shortages!

In that 3 week period, we used the Setpower AJ50 set at 25 deg as a freezer, 24 hours a day. It performed perfectly without any hiccups. It does exactly what it supposed to do for a lot less money than some of the more popular big name, big dollar units. We've since used the AJ50 in refrigerator mode with it set at 35 degrees for test 2 week period. Again it ran perfectly. This amazing unit has proven it can be relied on to work for a weekend away camping or an extended trip away as as either a fridge or freezer. The AJ50 has two compartments, the larger one cools to the set/required temperature. The smaller compartment normally reads at a couple of degrees above the main compartment setting. A handy light illuminates the contents of the AJ50 when you open the longitudinally hinged lid. There are four handy cup recesses in the lid too. Sturdy handles either side of the unit make it easy to move from one place to another. It can be moved by one person when empty but I do recommend having two people grab a handle each when it's full of goodies.

There is a basket that fits in the larger section allowing you to remove all the items in the section if desired.The door closes and the latch locks with a satisfying click. There is no leak of the temperature through the lid thanks to a full lid seal. We used freezer blocks (frozen by the Setpower) in a large hard sided cooler for items that needed refrigeration while we were using it as a freezer. The unit was amazingly quiet too. In fact, it was quieter than the full size fridge that died in the freeze. In this situation, a huge benefit with the Setpower is that it wasn't operationally affected by the freeze at all.

The AJ50 comes equipped with a Max and Eco settings. Switch it to MAX mode for fast cooling and when the desired temperature is achieved, switch over to ECO mode for energy saving while maintaining your temperature setting.The Setpower AJ50 uses compressor refrigeration technology with adjustable temperature from 0℉-50℉, which for us in our disaster situation was a bonus! 

The supplied power cord comes in three sections, a power block, a 12 volt DC car cigarette style plug and a 120/240 volt AC plug, all of which allow you to choose which power supply option you need. The AJ50 comes with multi-level battery power protection too. It protects against the main vehicle battery drain issue when using a portable fridge/freezer without the vehicle engine running.

You can find the Setpower AJ50 Portable Freezer Fridge HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

Freezes Without Ice: Strong compressor refrigeration technology with adjustable temperature from 0℉-50℉. 
 

Multiple Use: AC and DC cables are included in the original package, DC Power Cable for Car (12/24V); AC Adapter for Home Socket (110-240V).


Design: MAX Mode for Fast Cooling. ECO Mode for Energy Saving. 3 Level Voltage Battery Protection: prevent the car battery for running down.


Ooutdoor Adaptable: Work normally within 30° bumps, easily handle muddy mountain roads or steep valleys, perfect for Overlanding.


Quality Assurance: 2 years warranty on compressor and 1 year for other parts.

 

Specifications

Capacity: 53 QT / 50 L       Dimension (L*W*H): 27.5'' x 13.6'' x 20.7''       Temperature Range: 0℉ - 50℉       Wattage: 55 Watts

Voltage: DC—12/24V,  AC—110V-240V       Weight: 37.7 lbs

 

Package Includes:

AJ50 Unit, 12V Car Cigarette Lighter adapter, AC Adapter, User Manual, AJ50 Insulated Cover (sold separately)


 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 120v 12v 4runner ac power activated activity adventure american americas and antenna apocalypse art assignment automotive backup battery blog blog of the day blogs business camping canon cans car cb cell cell phone church cold commissioned communications construction contingency cooler crank daily danger devastating difficult disaster discussed dynalite earth east texas easy edition effectiveness elements em-5 emergencies emergency england eos equipment essential eventuality excellent fast film flashlight freelance freezer fridge frs fulfillment gmrs ham radio handle havoc hazard health home horsepower human hurricane icon infrastucture iron iso jeep joy kupo land cruiser lens lexar life light local logo loss loss of business machinery magazine manual meat micro usb midland military muscle new newspapers nikkor nikon noaa offroad olympus overland overlanding personal personal protection photo photographer photography physical physical health picnic plan plans portable portable power power power outage preparedness prepper processes products protection radio recharge renegade resources review rubicon security service services setpower shattering shoot society soda solar solar power special sponsered sponsor stand state storm storms story tacoma texas the theology trek trekking tropical storms truck unbiased unwanted unwanted sources usb usefulness vacation vivitar voice walkie talkie weather work works wrangler wx zombie zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/9/setpower-aj50-portable-fridge/freezer Mon, 06 Sep 2021 01:47:30 GMT
Emergency Preparedness: The ER10 Emergency Alert AM FM Weather Radio by Midland USA https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/1/emergency-preparedness-the-er10-emergency-alert-am-fm-weather-radio-by-midland-usa I recently reviewed the ER210 E+READY® Compact Emergency Crank Wx Radio by Midland USA for our Emergency Preparedness blog. A very capable, useful piece of equipment that can be appreciated by so many, and used in so many different fields. The backpacker, the adventurer, the prepper, the student and even the homebodies out there.

To complement their emergency line of products, Midland USA have introduced the ER210’s newer and littler sibling…the ER10 Emergency Alert AM FM Weather Radio.

The ER10 is small in general size compared to the ER210. It may have a few less features but it is by no means a less capable radio. It retains the brilliant NOAA National Weather Alert system, clock, AM/FM radio frequencies, LED Flashlight with Hi/Lo/Strobe capability, a headphone jack and the easily seen bright red case coloring. It is powered by 3 AA batteries (included). The crank option and rechargeable battery option on the ER-210 are omitted but it allows the ER10 to be considerably smaller and more compact. The ER10 will fit easily into a purse, coat or backpack pocket and even in a cargo pant pocket. Radio reception is on par with the bigger ER-210 and the user interface is the same, making transitioning from one radio to the other a breeze. Its size is reminiscent of the little transistor radios from when I was a young boy (many years ago).  

I would occasionally carry the ER-210 during my trips out of town, just in case something happened and I would need vital safety information. Since receiving the ER10, I find myself carrying and using it daily. Its smaller size is a bonus and its features are equally enjoyable as the bigger ER-210, so much that I now leave the ER-210 packed in my emergency communication hard case along with the Midland USA GXT1000VP4 radios, ready for the next power outage/disaster.

The ER10 should be an everyday carry item for everyone. Mobile phones are now so much a part of everyday life but their form, function and infrastructure can be fragile in so many ways. Having local news and local emergency weather information available and at hand is often ignored or dismissed. Carry one of the brilliant little ER10 Emergency Alert AM FM Weather Radios with you and when that moment we all hope doesn’t happen, happens…..you’ll be glad you have it with you.  

You can find the bigger Midland ER210 Emergency Alert AM FM Weather Radio HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

 

Features:

NOAA Weather Radio with Alert – delivers visual and audio alerts

LED High/Lo Beam Flashlight w/ SOS strobe

AM/FM Radio with Digital Clock

Headphone jack

Wrist Lanyard

Compact Size: 5" x 3" x 1.2"

Includes 3 Midland AA Batteries

 

In The Box

 

  • ER10 Radio
  • 3 AA Midland Batteries
  • Wrist Lanyard
  • Owner's Manual

     

 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 4runner activated activity adventure american americas and antenna apocalypse art assignment automotive battery blog blog of the day blogger blogs business camping canon car cb cell cell phone church commissioned communications construction contingency crank daily danger devastating difficult disaster discussed dynalite earth east texas easy edition effectiveness elements em-5 emergencies emergency england eos equipment essential eventuality fast film flashlight freelance frs fulfillment gmrs ham radio handle havoc hazard health home horsepower human hurricane icon infrastucture iron iso jeep joy kupo land cruiser lens lexar life light local logo loss loss of business machinery magazine manual micro usb midland military muscle new newspapers nikkor nikon noaa offroad olympus overland overlanding personal personal protection photo photographer photography physical physical health plan plans power preparedness prepper processes products protection radio recharge renegade resources review rubicon security service services shattering shoot society special sponsered sponsor stand state storm storms story tacoma texas the theology trek trekking tropical storms truck unbiased unwanted unwanted sources usb usefulness vacation vivitar voice walkie talkie weather work works wrangler wx zombie zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2021/1/emergency-preparedness-the-er10-emergency-alert-am-fm-weather-radio-by-midland-usa Thu, 28 Jan 2021 19:15:57 GMT
Midland X-Talker Extreme Dual Pack T77VP4 & GXT1000VP4 FRS/GMRS Radios Review https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/11/emergency-preparedness---midland-x-talker In our last blog, we gave a brief overview on FRS and GMRS radios, how they are used in everyday activities, how they can be utilized to great effect in your personal emergency preparedness plan and in actual emergency situations. In this blog, we are going to review two examples of Midland FRS and GMRS radios.

 

X-Talker Extreme Dual Pack T77VP5

Fully loaded with six different accessories the X-Talker Extreme Dual Pack includes two of Midlands feature packed T71 FRS (no license required) two-way radios along with some of the company's most popular accessories. Everything comes in a VERY nice, good quality firm-shell zippered carrying case with MIDLAND embossed on the lid. This case will protect your radios and accessories in most conditions but it's not a Pelican style hard case so don't go testing it by running over it with a Hummer!  

Inside the case is nicely done pre-cut foam insert containing the two T71 handsets which have 36 channels pre-programmed channels and 121 privacy or sub-channels (I'll go into more detail on the "privacy" channels a little later). Also in the case are two belt clips, two rechargeable batteries, a dual desktop charger, an AC wall charger, a Micro-USB charging cable, two boom microphone headsets, a 12v auto adapter and an owner's instruction manual.

The radios give clear, crisp communication with easy button control and access to the feature laden menu which includes:

  • NOAA Weather Alert Radio with "Weather Scan" which tunes into your local NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) frequency for up to date weather information and severe weather alerts.
  • "Silent Operation" mode - lets user to turn off all the tones for silent operation.
  • Hi/Lo power settings - lets user adjust power level and conserve battery life.
  • eVOX - hands free, voice only operation.
  • Auto Squelch.
  • "Roger" beep at the end of every transmission.
  • Bright, clear & readable backlit LCD display.
  • Keyboard lock.
  • Monitor (listen) mode - checks for activity on your programmed channel.
  • Low battery indicator.
  • 5 selectable call alerts.
  • Battery meter.
  • Headphone jack.

The radios can be charged via the supplied drop in charger or by Micro-USA port on the side of the radio. The X-Talker T77 radios come with a 3 year warranty. You can find the X-Talker Extreme Dual Pack T77VP5 HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

 

 

GXT1000VP4 TWO-WAY GMRS RADIO KIT

The kit comes with two GXT1000 radios with 50 pre-programmed FRS/GMRS channels plus 42 privacy (or sub-channels) giving you 3124 channel options to create private or secret channels (more on the "privacy" channels a little later).

Among the many included features and settings of the GXT1000 are:

  • Group channels..
  • Call alerts
  • 10 different call tones options to notify you of incoming calls from your "group".
  • NOAA Weather Alert Radio with "Weather Scan" which tunes into your local NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) frequency for up to date weather information and severe weather alerts.
  • The GXT1000's are rated JIS4 Waterproof* - protection in all directions against light rain or splashing water.
  • X-TRA TALK Power - for greater range
  • "SOS" Siren which allows the user to send out a distress or locator signal in an emergency situation.

In the GXT1000VP4 kit, you get two GXT1000 handsets, two belt clips, two rechargeable batteries, a dual desktop charger, an AC wall charger, a Micro-USB charging cable, two boom microphone headsets, a 12v auto adapter and an owners instruction manual. The GXT1000 radios come with a 3 year warranty.

It is to be noted that the quoted "36 mile Range" and Xtreme Range "up to 38 miles range" claims on the packaging of these radios is under "ideal circumstances". The important thing to remember is LINE OF SITE, no obstructions between the radios and no changes in the topographical elevation = flat terrain between units or out at sea ... these conditions are where you will see OPTIMUM coverage.

Unfortunately there is no case included like with the X-Talker Extreme Dual Pack kit so I picked up a bright orange lockable hard sided case, replaced the "Pick 'n' Pluck" foam with the awesome Kaizen foam, added the Midland ER210 E+Ready Compact Emergency Crank Wx Radio to the kit and made a custom ready to go Emergency Radio case.

You can find the GXT1000VP4 TWO-WAY GMRS RADIO KIT HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

 

 

Test and Evaluation

Specifically for this series on Emergency Preparedness in a suburban setting, I tested these units in what was most definitely NOT an ideal topographical environment. I did not achieve anywhere near the 36/38 mile range with these units. To evaluate the performance of the T71's from the Extreme Dual Pack and the GXT1000's from the VP4 kit, we had one radio from each set based with my wife in the home office and I took the other T71 and GXT1000 handsets plus a Midland MXT275 MicroMobile* mounted in my car to carry out the transmit and receive distance tests.

* A more detailed review on the MXT275 and MXT115 MicroMobiles will appear in a future blog.

The MXT275 MicroMobile is a 15 watt power unit and comes with a small 6" magnetic mount antenna  which was placed centrally on the roof of my car. As per the theme of this blog series, the test was carried out in a suburban location with some pretty severe challenges, changes in elevation up to 100 ft over a very short linear distance, lots of tall trees and 3 story buildings between radios. Due to the terrain, test transmissions were made every eighth of a mile. Obviously with a more powerful mobile unit, you would expect the smaller and lesser powered (0.5 watt) T71 and GXT1000 hand held to suffer in the range test, but that was not the case with this particular test. The X-Talker T71's could receive transmissions from the powerful MXT275 AND send back transmissions that were clear & audible at up to a mile and from there on messages were audible with static but were clear enough to understand. While the reachable distance of the T71's was much less than the "38 miles" posted on the box, for the most part, transmissions were clear and understandable for up to a mile and a half.

Considering the troublesome terrain and multiple obstructions, I was pretty impressed with the performance of the little portable radios. The X-Talker T71's have a fixed stubby antenna which is mandated by the FCC rules for FRS radios and the antenna size does restrict the distance the radio can transmit and receive effectively. The GXT1000 antenna is slightly longer/taller so you would expect a little further reach but there were a few times when the T71 performed a little better but both units were very capable given the tough task.

I was easily able to "customize both the T71 and GXT1000's to my preference with such things as Hi/Low & Hi/Med/Low power settings, alert tones, volume alert tones and volume. Both the T71 and GXT1000 come with privacy channels, which are not actually private. These extra channels allow you to block out other uses transmissions on your chosen channel so as not to disturb you or interrupt your conversations ... however,if they have not chosen to add the "privacy channel you chose, they are able to hear all the conversations on the main channel. Example, you have chosen to use channel 26 and "privacy channel" 32. If you and a friend are talking on channel 26 32, you will not be interrupted by any one else transmitting on channel 26 ... unless they also are using channel 26 32 ... but anyone else who has their radio set to just channel 26 and no "privacy channel", WILL hear your transmissions. Hopefully that isn't too confusing. Best to remember, none of your transmissions are actually private, so behave accordingly.

There are more options to tempt the techies out there if needed. The X-Talker T71 units are pretty small in overall size (6.1" tall, 2.45" wide) and the GXT1000 comes in a little bigger at 8' tall, 2.61" wide so they're easily stored in a pocket or on a backpack strap. The included belt clips are sturdy and work well on most belts up to 1.75" wide. Both the T71's and GXT1000's can be charged in their provided drop in charger, via usb in your car or with one of those portable power blocks you use to charge your cell phone or even one of those big 250W+ power stations. We're hoping to test a portable power station option in the future.

Conclusion: Please understand, my findings are exactly that ... my findings. The test location was not exactly typical of all suburban areas but it did provide a very good test of the radios abilities, under what was far from ideal conditions for most radios. Other people may achieve different results ... better or worse.

My initial goal was to identify a form of communication that was easy to use in a suburban emergency, where power and normal lines of communication were not available and could be used by family and friends alike. Once that was achieved, I wanted to see if the FRS and GMRS radios would be of any actual use in that setting.

Personally, all things considered, I think the Midland USA X-Talker Extreme Dual Pack T77VP5 and GXT1000VP4 Two Way GMRS Radio Kits were a huge success. I consider knowing the limitations of "something" is always a plus. When that "something" actually exceeds expectations, is to me, exceptional.


 

 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) :blog 4runner activated activity adventure american americas and antenna apocalypse art assignment automotive battery blog blogger blogs business camping canon car cb cell cell phone church commissioned communications construction contingency crank daily danger day" devastating difficult disaster discussed dynalite earth East Texas easy edition effectiveness elements EM-5 emergencies emergency England eos equipment essential eventuality fast film flashlight freelance frs fulfillment gmrs ham radio handle havoc hazard health home horsepower human hurricane icon infrastucture iron iso jeep joy kupo land cruiser lens lexar life light local logo loss loss of business machinery magazine manual micro usb midland military muscle new newspapers nikkor nikon noaa of offroad olympus overland overlanding personal personal protection photo photographer photography physical physical health plan plans power preparedness prepper processes products protection radio recharge renegade resources review rubicon security service services shattering shoot society special sponsered sponsor stand state storm storms story tacoma Texas the theology trek trekking tropical storms truck unbiased unwanted unwanted sources usb usefulness vacation Vivitar voice walkie talkie weather work works wrangler wx zombie zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/11/emergency-preparedness---midland-x-talker Tue, 01 Dec 2020 03:52:17 GMT
An introduction: FRS and GMRS radios https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/11/emergency-prepardness---an-introduction-to-frs-and-gmrs-radios Imagine the scene, you're the unfortunate victim of a storm, a winter white out, or a tropical hurricane that affects you at the local or maybe regional level. Your power is out, you have no cell service and of course, you need to contact someone ... check on a loved one, or worse, you need the assistance of the emergency services. What do you do?

You can always pop round to your neighbor ... but do they have power, maybe a generator? Is their cell service provider still up and running? Maybe they are one of the few who still have a landline telephone? If the answer is no to these questions, what are you going to do?

It's a grim scenario I know but it can be a frequent one depending where you live. To so many, this scene is never thought of, let alone discussed or planned for. Thankfully, all hope is not lost. Enter Midland USA and their line of FRS and GMRS two-way radios.

This is 2020 and mobile communications are nothing new. They have been around in various forms for decades but have recently grown in popularity due to the improvement in battery technology, providing more reliable and more powerful communication options. Aimed predominantly at the recreational market, FRS (Family Radio Service) & GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service) radios are relatively inexpensive and portable. They are most commonly used for short distance two-way communication using small hand held radios that appear similar to walkie-talkies. It is important to note that the equipment used for FRS is low power (0.5 watt) and therefore has a short transmit & receive range which can also be affected by the terrain around you.

Unlike Amateur radio, transmitting on FRS equipment does NOT require the user to have a license. On the other hand, transmitting on GMRS equipment will require the user to be licensed. There is no test to obtain a GMRS license, it is good for 10 years and allows all family members to use the licensee's equipment. Detailed information on FRS/GMRS networks and licensing is available on the FCC website. Click Here

Just like FRS, GMRS radios are relatively inexpensive and portable, used for short distance two-way communication using small hand held radios but are more powerful with hand held units (5 watt) and mobile vehicular type units (15-40 watt) that can utilize repeater stations for increased range. Battery life is generally very good obviously usage-dependent but can be maximized if transmission time is reduced and channel scanning is the major use. Most radios come supplied with rechargeable batteries but they can also be powered by regular AAA batteries. The radios can also be charged while on the go via the supplied USB cable in your vehicle or by an alternative portable power source.

These radios are very popular and in demand because of their reliability and proven performance. Campers, trekkers and overland enthusiasts have embraced FRS and GMRS. Jeep have adopted these systems for their hugely popular Jeep Jamborees, a series of off-road adventure weekends across the United States that bring together the outdoors, down-to-earth people and their Jeep 4x4 vehicles. These off-road treks have been a long tradition dating back to 1953! 

Don't dismiss these two-way radios as just for recreation though. Due to their size, cost and ease of use, FRS & GMRS two-way radios have found their way into many other worlds where instant and mobile communication is needed ... location photography, local event management/security, retail stores, factories and many others implement and utilize the commercial uses and benefits that the FRS/GMRS network offers.

As this blog series addresses Emergency Preparedness in a suburban environment, we feel that having a local FRS/GMRS radio community network can prove incredibly vital in an emergency situation. Initially the short range coverage may seem a negative point but setting up a local network of survivors and rescuers that have access to a handy communication tool would be invaluable in any crisis or emergency situation.

We received examples of The X-Talker, GXT-Pro and MicroMobile two-way radios from Midland USA for review and evaluation. The products tested are currently available from Midland USA and we will look in more detail at the features and performance of these radios in our next Emergency Preparedness blog.


 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 4runner activated activity adventure american americas and antenna apocalypse art assignment automotive battery blog blog of the day blogger blogs business camping canon car cb cell cell phone church commissioned communications construction contingency crank daily danger devastating difficult disaster discussed dynalite earth East Texas easy edition effectiveness elements EM-5 emergencies emergency England eos equipment essential eventuality fast film flashlight freelance frs fulfillment gmrs ham radio handle havoc hazard health home horsepower human hurricane icon infrastucture iron iso jeep joy kupo land cruiser lens lexar life light local logo loss loss of business machinery magazine manual micro usb midland military muscle new newspapers nikkor nikon noaa offroad olympus overland overlanding personal personal protection photo photographer photography physical physical health plan plans power preparedness prepper processes products protection radio recharge renegade resources review rubicon security service services shattering shoot society special sponsered sponsor stand state storm storms story tacoma Texas the theology trek trekking tropical storms truck unbiased unwanted unwanted sources usb usefulness vacation Vivitar voice walkie talkie weather work works wrangler wx zombie zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/11/emergency-prepardness---an-introduction-to-frs-and-gmrs-radios Tue, 01 Dec 2020 03:43:10 GMT
Emergency Preparedness: The ER210 E+READY® Compact Emergency Crank Wx Radio by Midland USA https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/10/emergency-preparedness-midland-usa-er210-e-ready-compact-emergency-crank-wx-radio The first in our series of Emergency Preparedness blogs delves into the subject of communications … and what you can do if you lose it.

During my 15 years living in East Texas, I’ve experienced the effects of 7 major hurricanes and tropical storms that have caused substantial damage to property and infrastructure across my local region. Following the loss of one’s home and possessions, the loss of utilities can be equally as devastating and is one of the unfortunate follow on effects of such disasters, one that can make an already dire situation even more unbearable.

Under normal everyday conditions, the loss of communications can be frustrating as heck. Whether we like to admit it or not, we take our cell phones for granted. It’s in our hands for hours of everyday and many run their lives through the use of cell phones. Communication with loved ones, browsing and shopping on the web, paying bills, posting on social media, catching up on the news in your city, state, and country … even internationally are all things done without a thought of how fragile the communication infrastructure is.

In my part of Texas, power supply interruption is inevitable during bad storms and hurricanes. Some residential homes have either a hard wired or a form of portable generator, If you don’t have access to a generator, the loss of power, even for one hour, is frustrating … any longer than an hour and it can seem like the world is coming to an end! No cell phone, no TV … no way to communicate, no way to know what’s going on outside the bubble we call home. Are there more storms, damage coming our way? Is help coming? And if so, when? How will we find out?

All hope is not lost. There are readily available alternatives to the cell phone. One of the most forgotten media devices out there is the humble radio. Yes, the radio. In fact, there is so much information available to us on our local radio stations. Just because we’re without power doesn’t mean everyone is. Commercial entities have generator backup so they can continue to function.

Another vital source for information is the equally important, often forgotten NOAA weather alert system. NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration) Weather Radio All Hazards (NWR) is a nationwide network of radio stations broadcasting continuous weather information directly from the nearest National Weather Service office. NWR broadcasts official Weather Service warnings, watches, forecasts and other hazard information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In conjunction with Federal, State, and Local Emergency Managers and other public officials, NWR also broadcasts warning and post-event information for all types of hazards – including natural (such as earthquakes or avalanches), environmental (such as chemical releases or oil spills), and public safety (such as AMBER alerts or 911 Telephone outages).

How can you access the NOAA broadcasts I hear you saying?

There are many different types of emergency radios equipped with NOAA WX access. One such radio is the ER210 E+READY® Compact Emergency Crank WX Radio from Midland USA.

 

This compact emergency weather alert crank radio is not just perfect for emergency situations, it’s also great for everyday use. It’s easily stowed anywhere and is a convenient companion in your preparedness kit or everyday gear bag. The availability of AM/FM radio along with NOAA weather alert channels will keep you connected no matter where you are or when you’ll need it.

 

I recently had the chance to review the ER210 E+READY® Compact Emergency Crank WX Radio which was generously provided by Midland USA. It is a very light and compact piece of technology. It can easily be held in one hand or attached to a backpack with a carabiner through the handle of the unit or popped into your bag if you need to be on the move.

 

 

 

The ER-210 E-ready radio can be powered FOUR ways: a rechargeable BATT22L Li-ion battery (supplied), a 1” x 2.5” solar panel mounted on the top of the radio, by a manually operated crank handle on the back of the unit, and (while you still have power) via a micro USB port under a rubber cover beneath the handle, which is also used to recharge the BATT22L Li-ion battery. You can even charge your cell phone via the regular USB port under the same cover as the micro USB!

 

 

For those all-important news and situational updates, the AM/FM stations are easily tuned by use of the band and up/down push buttons on the front panel and for up to date NOAA WX (weather reports), simply push the band button to toggle between AM/FM and WX until WX is shown on the display. Hold down the up or down button and the ER-210 will automatically scan and lock in to the local NOAA weather channel for your area….it is that simple.

There is a retractable, directional, 5 piece antenna to fine tune reception and a three power setting flashlight at the front of the radio (low, high and SOS mode) activated by a little button above the light in front of the solar panel. Also beneath the rubber USB cover is an earphone/headphone jack.

 

 

I think this little radio is an absolute gem. It’s compact, easy to use and doesn’t have to be stored away and forgotten until the next power outage. Carry it with you every day, use it when you’re outside away from a power supply, listen to the radio on the ER-210 and save your cell phone battery, or you can even use the radio to charge your cell phone while it charges itself through the solar panel. This little thing is SO useful !

 

An important thing to remember is, when the power is off and there is no way to find out what the heck is happening around you, who wouldn’t want one of these ER210 E+READY® Compact Emergency Crank WX Radios with four power options, AM/FM/Weather radio, an emergency flashlight plus a USB charger for your phone. It would be a great idea to get one for your parents and Grandparents too!  I’m certainly glad I have one. 

You can find the Midland ER210 Emergency Alert AM FM Weather Radio HERE through our Amazon affiliate link.

 

 

Here are the all-important specifications:

  • Multiple Sustainable Power Sources – Solar, hand crank, rechargeable battery
  • Extremely Bright Flashlight Uses Cree®* LEDs – 1400 Lux
  • SOS Flashlight Beacon – Activates Morse code for emergency assistance
  • Long Battery Life – 2000 mAh rechargeable Li-Ion battery gives up to 25 hours of normal use
  • Smartphone/Tablet Charger – Charge your devices through USB connection
  • NOAA Weather Radio with Alert – Weather alerts sound when issued on local channel
  • Low/High Flashlight Brightness Settings – Lets you adjust to conserve battery life
  • Ideal for Emergency Preparedness, Camping, Beach, Park, and Everyday Use
  • Digital AM/FM and Weather Band Radio
  • Dimensions - 6.5'' x 2.8'' x 1.9''

 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 4runner activated activity adventure american americas and antenna apocalypse art assignment automotive battery blog blog of the day blogger blogs business camping canon car cb cell cell phone church commissioned communications construction contingency crank daily danger devastating difficult disaster discussed dynalite earth East Texas easy edition effectiveness elements EM-5 emergencies emergency England eos equipment essential eventuality fast film flashlight freelance frs fulfillment gmrs ham radio handle havoc hazard health home horsepower human hurricane icon infrastucture iron iso jeep joy kupo land cruiser lens lexar life light local logo loss loss of business machinery magazine manual micro usb midland military muscle new newspapers nikkor nikon noaa offroad olympus overland overlanding personal personal protection photo photographer photography physical physical health plan plans power preparedness prepper processes products protection radio recharge resources review rubicon security service services shattering shoot society special sponsered sponsor stand state storm storms story Texas the theology trekking tropical storms truck unbiased unwanted unwanted sources usb usefulness vacation Vivitar voice walkie talkie weather work works wrangler wx zombie zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/10/emergency-preparedness-midland-usa-er210-e-ready-compact-emergency-crank-wx-radio Tue, 27 Oct 2020 23:48:03 GMT
Future Blog subjects https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/10/future-blog-subjects A little update with reference to our last blog and some of the content coming in future blogs.

One of the subjects we'll be covering is Emergency Preparedness. No, not for the zombie apocalypse, not yet anyway.

As we are based in East Texas, we have endured our fair share of hurricanes and tropical storms that play havoc with essential services such as power and communications. The inevitable loss of power and communications not only have an adverse effect on business but more importantly on our home life and our physical health. The effects on local and state infrastructure and the loss of these essential services, be it for a few hours or worse, days or weeks, not having some kind of contingency plan(s), can be devastating. Having a plan and back up resources for such eventuality is vitally important.

We'll be looking at and reviewing some products that can help take away some of the stress and worry during emergencies. We'll be looking at alternatives to communications, power and forms of personal protection from the elements and other unwanted sources.

Most of the topics and the equipment that'll be used and discussed in these blogs will be new to us. It'll be interesting to see how difficult or easy the processes, usefulness and effectiveness of these products will be.

I'm looking forward to learning a lot, about the whole process and myself.

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) activated american americas and apocalypse art assignment automotive blog blog of the day blogger blogs business canon car church commissioned communications construction contingency crank daily danger devastating difficult disaster discussed dynalite earth East Texas easy edition effectiveness elements EM-5 emergencies emergency England eos equipment essential eventuality fast film freelance fulfillment handle havoc health home horsepower human hurricane icon infrastucture iron iso joy kupo lens lexar life light local logo loss loss of business machinery magazine manual micro usb midland military muscle new newspapers nikkor nikon noaa olympus personal personal protection photo photographer photography physical physical health plan plans power preparedness prepper processes products protection radio resources review security service services shattering shoot society special sponsered sponsor stand state storm storms story Texas the theology tropical storms truck unbiased unwanted unwanted sources usb usefulness Vivitar voice work works wx zombie zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/10/future-blog-subjects Wed, 07 Oct 2020 16:38:16 GMT
product reviews ... coming soon https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/10/coming-soon Today's blog is going to be a little shorter than recent posts……consider it more of a "heads up" or an FYI instead of the previous photo shoot or image storylines.

As a purchaser and end user of equipment or a process, I’m always looking for reviews of potential new gear/equipment purchases and instructional articles or videos on how to do something. It may be photographic related or something I may use in my personal life. I have no doubt, like me, you have experienced times where hours of endless web and YouTube searches have resulted in nothing remotely close to what you were looking for or needed....or if you actually find that product or service listed in the search, the results are of little use or of poor quality.

At those moments, I have often thought maybe I should write my own review or instruction piece in this blog. Why I actually haven’t done it is really a mystery because I’ve have written the occasional review on product I’ve purchased online. I’ve even considered doing a YouTube channel. Who knows? It could happen.

So, I finally decided it was time to do it, to put my thoughts and opinions out there and blog about them.

Coming up soon, I’ll be reviewing products and services on a varying range of topics, some photography related, some not. You may even be surprised on some of the items/topics chosen to review. Of course, as I’m a photographer, images will be included, along with any disclosure if the product/service was purchased by me or provided or loaned by a company or individual. With that said, I want to state that my thoughts and opinions will be unbiased and not influenced by anyone or anything. If a company offers to sponsor a blog entry, the blog will still be a “warts and all” review.

Now please note, the thoughts, ramblings and opinions on any product/services included in my blog entries, their use and effectiveness, are simply that, my thoughts and opinions, on how they work for me and my needs. These thoughts and opinions should not be taken as a definitive result of the product’s effectiveness and usability and are not intended to sway your decisions one way or another. My needs may not be your needs or you may prefer a different product's method of use - it's user interface for example. My reviews, thoughts and comments will hopefully be informative and are offered so that they may help you in your search and to help you be informed how different people find them useful ... or not.

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 1960's 1966 2016 500cc activated american americas and antonio art asa assignment austrailian australian automotive blog blog of the day blogger blogs blue BMW bridgestone british california canon car ce-4s championship Chinon choir church circuit cm4 commissioned commodore construction cota daily Daytona dealership disaster donington driver dynalite earth edition EM-5 emblem England eos e-type fast film ford freelance fulfillment garth grand GT hodgetts holden horsepower human icon iron iso jaguar jersey joy kupo laguna seca lens lexar light logo m5 machinery magazine mallory park mamola manual military montgomery motorcycle motorsport muscle musclecar new newspapers nikkor nikon of old olympus OMD oval owner pastor photo photography pleasure point pony pride prix product red review san security service shattering sheene shiny shoot SLR soft special sponsered sponsor stand story supercars tander texas the theology top' touring truck unbiased v8 v8x vintage Vivitar voice work works xke Yellow zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2020/10/coming-soon Thu, 01 Oct 2020 19:16:13 GMT
How it all started...part 2 https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2019/12/how-it-all-started-part-2 Today we carry on the story of my journey through photography, from the film to digital formats. More specifically, camera bodies where I detailed my early days of 110 film Instamatics through the progression into Single Lens Reflex cameras with Chinon and onto more professional grade Canon SLR film bodies.

The previous post left off with me at the brilliant Donington Park race circuit in Castle Donington, Leicestershire (England). At that time, I was armed and ready with my first Canon film body, the EOS 650 and 35-70mm & 75-150mm lenses. The EOS 650 would shoot at 3 frames per second, not exactly super fast for motorsport. It was no way the top Canon equipment but it was not the bottom level either.

I was working freelance for one of my hometown newspapers to cover a local race driver, Chris Hodgetts (two time British Touring Champion), racing in the British Sportscar Championship.  

 

Canon EOS 650 Film SLR (Supplied Image)

 

I met with Chris and was introduced to the team. Getting to know the race team is vitally important to gain trust and the permission for access to otherwise unauthorized areas. Chris introduced me to the team manager. He asked me what kind of shots I’d be taking and where I’d like to be. After assuring him that I would stay out of the way and not shoot “sensitive areas” of the cars, the team manager asked could I “get some shots for us?  I have some gear and a bit of film with me, you can use it if you want,” he added. I recollect wondering what “gear” he had. I remember thinking, “nothing decent I bet.”  Boy was I wrong !!!

We walked from the team hauler, out to his car. He popped open the trunk and opened this huge holdall. There must have been a pause….my mouth was left gaping…..I was speechless. There in his hand was a brand new Canon EOS 1 complete with Canon's Power Drive Booster E1
grip which upped the standard frame rate 3 fps up to 6 frames per second. Attached was the amazing and huge 300mm f2.8 L series lens !!!  

 

 

Canon EOS 1-HS Film SLR (supplied Image)

 

Now, this may not seem anything to you back then or as you’re reading this now, but at that time, the EOS 1 camera and 300 f2.8 L series lens were the holy grail of equipment for motorsports photographers !  I calmly took hold of the camera and lens….man they were HEAVY. It is hard to comprehend how heavy film cameras and lenses used to be. Very little plastic was used in the professional line of Canon and Nikon equipment. Nowadays there are exotic materials such as Titanium used in the professional digital gear. I’d not actually held either of these items in the flesh. Many times I’d anticipated the day when I’d actually own them but that was as close as I’d gotten. I’d hoped that my lack of outward expression or spoken words hadn’t given the game away and that I’d hidden my inner pleasure and maintained my “professional persona”. This was going to be a GOOD day to shoot some racing !!!
 

A Canon EOS 1 with the 300mm f2.8 L Series Lens (Supplied Image)

 

The team manager handed me a bag of color film….”here’s 12 rolls of film….shoot what and when you can, I know you're here to shoot for the paper. Heck, shoot your film through it if you want”.  You can image I didn’t need a second to decide to do exactly that !

I spent the day trackside capturing Hodgetts for my assignment and the team, switching from the team supplied Kodak color film and my publication supplied black & white Ilford HP5+. My regular gear wasn’t excessively heavy or bulky and was easily used handheld … unlike the substantially heavier EOS 1 and huge & heavy 300mm lens !  For a day shooting at trackside, hand holding this beast of a setup was a tough task. Thankfully the lack of monopod didn’t ruin the day and supporting the lens tripod mount on my left knee that was perched on the trackside wall worked perfectly for longer shot spreads.  The shot below was used by the publication to accompany the report on Hodgetts' weekend. 

Hodgetts Sportscar at Donington Park 1990. Shot with Canon EOS 1, Canon 300mm f2.8L Lens. (Image © Bourne Images)

 

I've been covering motorsport in Europe and the United States now for over 30 years and I have to say that this image is still one of my favorite captures. I don't know if it's the first time I shot with professional camera equipment, or the first time shooting LeMans type Sportscars, or the sparks from the Titanium skid plates under the front spoiler. Whatever it is, this image is very dear to my heart.

After being spoiled by a foray into the professional motorsport camera equipment world, I decided that another camera body upgrade was needed. A trip to Jessops Camera store in Birmingham (England) saw me quickly replace the EOS 650 with a new Canon EOS 10 body. Another EOS 10 was added 3 months later as a backup.

I continued to shoot with the EOS 10 bodies throughout the 1990’s and into 2001. The main topic of my photography was motorsport with 15 to 20 weddings per year intermingled for good measure.

Canon EOS 10 (Image Supplied)

 

Freelance newspaper and magazine assignments saw me cover British and International motorsport on both four and two wheels. The opportunity to document the build and shakedown of a BMW M5 for ED Arnold Racing and then a trip to Laguna Seca Raceway in California to cover Hodgetts race the M5 in the Bridgestone Supercar Championship came in 1993. Nascar events at Charlotte Motor Speedway, Dover Downs Speedway and a number of teams shops in and around the Mooresville NC area were the highlight of 1989 and 1990. 

My move from England to the North Carolina in the USA saw a huge reduction in my photography work. I made the decision to sell my SLR gear and purchase an Olympus point and shoot digital camera. I was not heavily inspired to shoot much during the very early 2000’s and can’t actually remember what model the little digital Olympus was !  A new life in a new country was ahead and other things took priority over my photography.

My move from NC to Texas in 2005 saw my love for photography rekindled along with a return to motorsport and wedding photography. The choice of equipment was a tricky one. Digital was now the big thing, film was all but dead. I had no real experience of digital cameras or indeed the digital world of photography. Gone were the days of taking film to the lab, passing on any requirements reference the processing the negatives and printing of the images. Now it was Jpegs, RAW, megapixels, computers and Photoshop !

 

In the next edition of the Bourne Images Blog.......

"How it all started...Part 3".....The crazy world of Digital Photography and how an invitation to shoot for a motorsport magazine from across the other side of the world led to meeting a racing hero !

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 1960's 1966 2016 500cc activated american americas and antonio art asa assignment austrailian australian automotive blog blog of the day blogger blue BMW bridgestone british california canon car ce-4s championship Chinon choir church circuit cm4 commissioned commodore construction cota daily Daytona dealership disaster donington driver dynalite earth edition EM-5 emblem England eos e-type fast film ford freelance fulfillment garth grand GT hodgetts holden horsepower human icon iron iso jaguar jersey joy kupo laguna seca lens lexar light logo m5 machinery magazine mallory park mamola manual military montgomery motorcycle motorsport muscle musclecar new newspapers nikkor nikon of old olympus OMD oval owner pastor photo photography pleasure point pony pride prix red san security service shattering sheene shiny shoot SLR soft special stand story supercars tander texas the theology top' touring truck v8 v8x vintage Vivitar voice work works xke Yellow zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2019/12/how-it-all-started-part-2 Sun, 08 Dec 2019 23:30:40 GMT
How it all started... https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2019/11/how-it-all-started Welcome back … today’s blog is a little departure from my previous posts. As I constantly look for ways to keep the blog fresh and interesting, I’m aware that some of you may want different types of photographic content other than image reviews.

When I first started in photography (MANY moons ago) it was film and slides … no digital. My first camera was a Vivitar 815 110 cartridge film point & shoot.  Remember those?  It had a slide switch that would give you a 24mm and a “zoom” 48mm lens option, such high tech!  Back then, I lived in England and I was a huge motorcycle racing fan. I spent most weekends at various race tracks watching riders such as Sheene, Haslam, Hailwood, Parrish etc, capturing images with my trusty 110.

 

Vivitar 815 Tele Lens 110 Film Point & Shoot Camera circa 1970's/80's. (Image Supplied)

 

After one particular weekend in 1980 spent watching Sheene and Mamola, I returned from the local film processing shop and eagerly flipped through the shots I’d taken.  As you’d expect, with a fixed lens point & shoot, the images weren’t going to set the world on fire. I’d learned about panning and with the limitations of the camera and film speed (ISO/ASA), I managed to get acceptable results. As I flipped to the next photograph … WOW!  I’d captured Randy Mamola speeding away from the hairpin at Mallory Park on his RG500 Suzuki perfectly. I remember at that moment thinking If I can get that kind of result with a point & shoot, what could I do with a proper camera?!

So, the next afternoon, keenness and bravado saw me walking into the local Dixons electronics store (kind of a Best Buy of its day) and walking out some while later armed and ready with my first “proper” camera, a 50mm prime and 75-150 zoom lens.

 

Chinon CM4 Manual 35mm Film SLR Camera (Image Supplied)

 

The camera was a Chinon CM4. A bare bones, fully manual, Single Lens Reflex … no auto exposure modes ... just manual — a real camera!  I remember it had a really basic but very intuitive exposure display set into the left side of the viewfinder housing. It had a three vertical light metering confirmation system. Top light was red (indicating overexposed), middle was green (indicating correct exposure) and the bottom light was red (indicating under exposed). It was a very simple system that I quickly came to love and it helped me learn more about exposure and how changes to the aperture setting on the lens and/or shutter speeds affected the exposure values.

 

The exposure display lights can be clearly seen on the left side of the viewfinder window (Image Supplied)

 

A little while later, I added the newer version of the Chinon camera line to my camera bag … the new semi auto version CE4s, along with a battery grip. This brought on a newer learning curve with aperture/shutter priority modes and a new (to me) visual metering display.

With this new equipment, my photography came on leaps and bounds, with assignments alongside some seasoned pros and a greater emphasis on learning, not just taking pictures. Remember, this is way before YouTube and Wikipedia.  Tips and advice were always welcome and put to good use. I assisted in a wedding and was soon shooting 20-30 weddings per year, all without any advertising.

 


Chinon CE-4s Semi Automatic 35mm Film SLR camera (Image Supplied)

 

A chance opportunity to sample a Canon Autofocus SLR film camera had me scrambling to switch out my camera kit. I upgraded to a Canon EOS 650 camera body along with a 50mm, 35-70mm and 75-150mm lens. 
.

 

Canon EOS 650 Semi Automatic, Autofocus 35mm Film SLR Camera (Image Supplied)

 

In 1990, I started freelancing motorsport coverage for two local newspapers. On an assignment to cover a local driver, I was asked by the race team owner to “get some shots for us?  I have some gear with me, you can use it if you want,” he added. I recollect wondering what “gear” he actually had. I remember thinking, “nothing decent I bet.”  Boy was I wrong !!!

 

In the next edition of the Bourne Images Blog……..

"How it all started...Part 2"......How a great afternoon turned things up a notch in my photography career and the switch to digital photography.

 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 1960's 1966 2016 500cc grand prix activated american americas and antonio art asa assignment austrailian australian automotive blog blog of the day blogger blogs blue british california Canon car ce-4s championship Chinon choir church circuit cm4 commissioned commodore construction cota daily Daytona dealership disaster driver dynalite earth edition EM-5 emblem England eos e-type fast film film photography ford freelance fulfillment garth GT holde holdon horsepower human icon iron iso jaguar jersey joy kupo lens lexar light logo machinery magazine mallory park mamola manual military montgomery motorcycle motorsport muscle musclecar new newspapers nikkor nikon of old olympus OMD oval owner pastor photo photography pleasure point and shoot pony pride red san security service shattering sheene shiny shoot SLR soft special stand story supercars tander texas the theology top' touring truck v8 v8x vintage Vivitar voice work works xke Yellow zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2019/11/how-it-all-started Wed, 13 Nov 2019 17:27:50 GMT
A man, a Mustang and 43 years...Part 2 https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/11/a-man-a-mustang-and-43-years-part-2 In this new blog entry, we continue the story of Conrad, his love of the Mustang and his life after the destruction of his beloved 1967 bronze, black vinyl top, 289 Mustang.

 

Image Info:   Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 15mm, 1/250 sec @ f22,       Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox

 

"Following on from that fateful night and the destruction of my beloved 1967 289, I attended two years of college, married the “church choir girl,” enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1975, attended seminary after the Corps, pastored a church, and commissioned in the Air Force as a chaplain. In May of 2016 after forty-and-one-half-years in military service, my “church-choir girl” said, “OK, it’s your turn. You’ve always been in love with the “other girl of your life…the mustang,” and you’ve always bought family cars since we started a family. For your retirement gift I want you to get your mustang!” I hesitated at first.

 

Image Info:   Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 17mm, 1/250 sec @ f22,       Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox

 

At 61, I asked myself, did I really want to drive a 2016 Mustang California Special, 5.0, putting out 425 horsepower, with 400 pounds of torque ?.... I’m a chaplain so I’ll just say…YES! The deal was done and I am the proud owner of a 2016 beauty and I drive it almost every day. She is my daily driver. We take her on road trips and for the first time since 1973, I again have that feeling of “I can’t believe I own this car.”

 

Image Info:   Nikon D7100, Nikkor 17-55 @ 55mm, 1/50 sec @ f8,       Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, CheetahStand V850 x2

 

It was so obvious to see throughout the day we spent with Conrad and Nilda, the love these two people had for each other ....and for the Mustang. As Conrad talked so enthusiastically about his Mustang, Nilda's face was equally as expressive, filled with happiness that her husband was once again able to fulfill his wish to own his dream car. As Conrad and I talked he told me:

 "Here's another true cliché, “I feel I’m on vacation every time I get in it.” Since its purchase, I’ve modified it a little but nothing that takes away from the “Mustang curves". I’ve upgraded the exhaust and installed the Ford Performance Pack 2 with tune. Next, is installing the Ford Track Pack suspension system with 4.09 gears…and that’s it…I think!

 

Image Info:   Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 23mm, 1/250 sec @ f22,       Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox
 

Nilda and I want to thank Graham and Brenda for taking such good care in taking the best pictures of my beauty. The large collage photograph they created from the images is hanging on my office wall and the pictures rotate on my computer laptop. “It looks like it’s moving standing still!”

 

 

As a photographer and a self confessed gear head, it is always satisfying to meet and interact with others who share my passion for all things automotive. It is also very humbling to be in the presence of those who selflessly give so much to others without a thought for themselves and in turn see them rightfully rewarded. 

 

Conrad my friend, enjoy your beautiful Mustang.....drive her as often as you can. It was an honor to meet you and your beautiful wife Nilda. We thank you for your service to your country. May Nilda and you cherish every moment spent looking back over your incredible journey together......and embrace the road ahead to many more.

 

 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 1960's 1966 2016 activated american americas and antonio art austrailian automotive blog blog of the day blogger blogs blue california car championship choir church circuit commissioned construction cota daily Daytona dealership disaster driver dynalite earth edition EM-5 emblem fast ford fulfillment GT horsepower human icon iron jersey joy kupo lens lexar light logo machinery magazine military motorcycle motorsport muscle musclecar new nikkor nikon of olympus OMD oval owner pastor photo photography pleasure pony pride san security service shattering shiny shoot special stand story supercars texas the theology touring truck vintage voice work Yellow zuiko https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/11/a-man-a-mustang-and-43-years-part-2 Wed, 14 Nov 2018 18:15:29 GMT
A man, a Mustang and 43 years...part 1 https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/9/a-man-a-mustang-and-43-years Wow, it really has been a while since my last blog post hasn’t it ??!!!!!!......it’s incredible how time can get away from you when you’re not paying real close attention to it.

Now let me state it here, right now…there are no excuses……no earth shattering disaster that kept me away from the keyboard……it was just the crazy hustle and bustle of everyday life and it’s new experiences, some of which, will definitely find their way onto the screen in front of you.

This blog is going to be a little different to the previous two. It will be posted in two parts. Yes, it is going to be about an image…..several to be exact, hence I wanted to do Conrad, Nilda and their beautiful automobile justice and give this wonderful, touching story the time and consideration it deserves.

 

Image: Nikon D7100, Nikkor 17-55 @ 24mm  1/50 sec @ f8,   Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4 x2, Cheetahstand V850, Kupo Light stand

 

In the latter part of 2016, we had the tremendous pleasure of crossing paths with a wonderful couple from the San Antonio area of Texas. Conrad & his wonderful wife Nilda commissioned us to document Conrad’s new pride and joy, a 2016 Ford Mustang 5.0 GT California Special. Nothing new there you may say. There are many new car owners eager to document their new car, motorcycle or truck. As you are about to read, there is a whole lot more to Conrad’s story than just the purchase of a shiny new car………

 

Image: Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 28mm, 1/250 sec @ f22,      Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4    Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox
 

Over a few weeks organizing the photo-shoot, I got to hear Conrad & Nilda’s wonderful story of how Conrad’s life changed from one of disaster and disappointment, through to love, dedication to his country through military service and the fulfillment of a dream that started many years earlier.

Conrad’s story starts back in 1968, when a young 13 year old boy saw what was to become the car of his dreams and fell in love for the very first time.

 

Image Info: Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 15mm, 1/250 sec @ f22,      Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox
 

Conrad explained:

“I have fallen in love at-first-sight twice in my life. The first time was when at 13 I saw a brand new 1966 mustang parked on my city block in northern New Jersey. The second time was when at 16, I saw “the most beautiful girl in the world” get up with the choir to sing in church. That girl today is my wife of 43 years. The mustang was much harder to get.

As a young boy falling instantly in love with the mustang, I read every car magazine I could on the mustang. I stayed “in touch” with the developments by going in the evening to local Ford dealerships to see and touch, what is a cliché, but also a truism, that the car looked like it was moving standing still.

In 1973, as a senior in high school I finally was able to afford a 1967 bronze, black vinyl top, 289, 200 horsepower, 2-barrel carb beauty. I think I paid a little over $600 (that was a lot of money back then for a senior in high school saving his every penny). The engine had been abused and not well-taken care…a sin in my book of theology. I figured if I kept enough oil in the engine it would hold up until I could get it rebuilt. The engine was the least of my worries.”

 

Image Info:   Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 21mm, 1/250 sec @ f20,       Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox

 

“I graduated high school and went off to college. I drove my daily driver to school every day and at night to work. I worked at a construction company as a security guard. One night I parked my pony outside a high rise under construction and high winds that night tipped over a huge log being used to hold up floors. Yep, you guessed it, the log came crashing down lengthwise on top of my beauty. She was totaled and my heart broken.”

 

I remember my feelings as Conrad related the events of that fateful day. I could feel the pain still deep in his words. I imagined how I would have felt if that were me and my pride and joy. My emotions would have run riot. I would have been speechless, tears would have flowed by the gallon.....tens of gallons !!!!. I know that many, if not all of the petrol heads reading this would’ve shed a tear if they would have been in Conrad’s place that day. For those not so passionate about cars, motorcycles, trucks etc, it must be difficult to comprehend such feelings. To those, an automobile could seem like just a piece of metal, an inanimate object. To us, our vehicles are our pride and joy. They evoke emotions and are precious to us. There are so many deep feelings involved in owning these incredible pieces of machinery. To have it taken away, to experience the gut wrenching pain of seeing it destroyed is unimaginable and something we all hope never happens to us.

 

Image Info: Olympus OMD-EM5, Zuiko 12-40 @ 12mm, 1/250 sec @ f20,       Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4, Cheetah 12x36 Stripbox

 

** Next post..... A man, a Mustang and 43 years,
part 2 coming very soon ** 

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) 1960's 1966 2016 american icon american iron austrailian automotive automotive photography blog blog of the day blogger blogs blue oval california car car photography choir church circuit of the americas commissioned construction cota daily driver Daytona Daytona Yellow disaster dynalite earth shattering emblem fast ford magazine ford ford dealership ford owner fulfillment GT horsepower human human voice activated light stand icon kupo lens lexar logo machinery magazine military military service motorcycle motorsport muscle car musclecar new jersey nikkor nikon olympus olympus OMD EM-5 pastor photo photo shoot pleasure pony pony car pride and joy san antonio security shiny special edition story supercars texas theology touring car touring car championship truck vintage work of art zuiko zuiko lens https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/9/a-man-a-mustang-and-43-years Mon, 24 Sep 2018 16:15:21 GMT
Image Review: Jaguar XK E-Type https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/1/image-review-jaguar-xk-e-type In today’s blog, we look at one of the British automotive icons from the 1960’s….the Jaguar XK E-Type. Made popular by scores of 60’s fashion models, film stars and sports personalities, this sleek looking car has become popular the world over. This particular example was captured during a marathon shoot of vintage cars at the incredible facility at Old Iron Works in Montgomery, Texas. 

This particular shot was to be one of those where you set up the shot, the lighting is ready to go, the image is framed perfectly, everything is ready. What happened next was an innocent movement that changed the whole look and perspective of the shot…...for the better !

I had in my mind, the Jaguar being captured from the front. Its bug eye headlights and basking shark type mouth prominent and the beam of our studio lights following the lines of the shoulders of the vehicle. Everything was ready. A final check through the viewfinder and I was ready to take the shot.

However, just as I was about to clear the car area, my shooting partner/assistant (wife Brenda) was also looking at options for shot angles and opened the doors wide, in turn, creating the winged Jaguar look. My first thoughts were “????”  my shot ?!!.....err…..hang on a minute (insert smile !!)

What followed was a rethink of the shot and the realization that this alternative was a shot with far more impact, more visually exciting and complimentary to the lines of the Jaguar. It was one of those moments where the spark from two creative minds go off at the same time, creating something better than what was first imagined. There are many times where we have our individual “visions” for a shot and those where we collaborate on our ideas.

On this occasion, an innocent action created a far more visually creative result.

 

Image Info: Nikon D7100, Nikkor 17-55 @ 23mm, 1/250 @ f/22.      Lighting: Dynalite Baja B4's, Cheetahstand Strip boxes, Kupo stands

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) austrailian automotive automotive photography blog blog of the day blogger blogs british circuit of the americas cota dynalite e-type garth tander holde holdon commodore icon jaguar kupo lexar montgomery motorsport nikkor nikon old iron works red soft top' 1960's texas the australian touring car championship touring car v8 supercars v8x magazine vintage xke https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/1/image-review-jaguar-xk-e-type Tue, 23 Jan 2018 23:57:34 GMT
Image Review: Australian V8 Supercars 2013 at The Circuit Of The Americas https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/1/welcome-to-the-bourne-images-blog Firstly, Happy New Year !!

Welcome to the Bourne Images Blog and our first official post. We plan to post a weekly blog, some small, some larger. They will be on a range of subjects but all will be related in some way to photography....obviously. Some will include an image, some not. 

Todays blog is a look back at an image and an event very dear to my heart. I am a HUGE fan of the Australian Supercars series. It is a sedan based motor racing series that has seen a few changes of car styles and engine configurations since since I started following it back in 1986. Over the years, it has been labelled "The Australian Touring Car Championship", "Australian V8 Supercars", "V8 Supercars" and currently "The Virgin Australia Supercars". The series currently is in the last year of racing with solely V8 engines....from 2018 the rule book allows teams to run anything from 4, 6 or 8 cylinders with normal aspirated engines or turbo charged. The series is shown in many countries outside of Australia and New Zealand....the UK, Europe, Canada, The Far East. Unfortunately, it is not commonly aired in the USA, only rumored sporadic showings on the CBS Sports Network.....personally, based in Texas, I never see any CBS Sports listings for it.

The image below is from May 2013 when the then named V8 Supercars made their one and only visit to American shores......"The Texas 400" at The Circuit Of The Americas, Austin, Texas. Despite following the series since 1986, I had never had the opportunity to see the racing in person......until then. There were supposed to be 5 visits of the V8 Supercars to Texas but year two was cancelled due to a "date conflict" and then shortly after, the agreement between V8 Supercars and the organizers at COTA was disolved completely.

Image Info: Nikon D7100, Nikkor 17-55mm, 1/320 @ f/9
 

On the lead up to the Texas visit of the V8 Supercars, I was offered to incredible opportunity to be a guest photographer for the Australian V8X Magazine photography team, led by Justin Deeley and second photographer Peter Norton. OBVIOUSLY I snapped it up !!!...sorry for the pun.

This shot was taken on the Thursday evening as the teams began setup and pit practice prior to the on track events on the Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Here, the Holden Racing Team were going through their routine pit stop practice with the #2 Holden Commodore of Garth Tander. The eagle eyed among you will notice they are using the treaded "wet" weather tires and not the normal "slick" un-treaded tires. The governing body of V8 Supercars ruled that for the un-timed practice sessions, teams would use the treaded tires so that drivers could acclimatize themselves to the track layout without using up their allocation of slicks for for the event.

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bourneimages@usa.com (Bourne Images) austrailian blog blogpost circuit of the americas cota garth tander holde holdon commodore motorsport nikkor nikon texas the australian touring car championship touring car v8 supercars v8x magazine https://www.bourneimages.com/blog/2018/1/welcome-to-the-bourne-images-blog Tue, 02 Jan 2018 18:59:31 GMT